Work in progress

I’m currently working on a novel about highwaymen.  As well as researching 18th Century slang, I’ve been looking at folk stories and ballads of the time for inspiration.

I’ve decided to include some faux (as opposed to folk) ballads in the story, in the way that songs appear in a libretto or a Shakespeare play.   Here’s an example, which tells a simple story of doomed love.  If there are any Country and Western artists out there who would like to set it to music, the rights are available!

THE SAD SONG OF THE TRAGIC LOVERS

 

Don’t leave me now, my only love,

For I shall pine without thee;

And though the sun may shine above,

Darkness shall reign within me.

 

They met at the water’s edge,

Just as the sun did rise.

They made themselves a binding pledge,

Never to utter lies.

 

Into their lives a man did come,

Just as the sun made noon.

His handsome looks, they struck her dumb,

He knew he’d have her soon.

 

Her lover guessed the awful truth

And hurried to the brook.

As sunset came he saw the proof,

With one regretful look.

 

Don’t leave me now, my only love,

For I shall pine without thee;

And though the sun may shine above,

Darkness shall reign within me.

 

He took a gun and took his aim,

He fired a single round,

But she stood in the bullet’s way,

And toppled to the ground.

 

Her blood ran down the babbling brook,

As her life flowed away.

With his last round, his life he took,

And died with her that day.

 

Don’t leave me now, my only love,

For I shall pine without thee;

And though the sun may shine above,

Darkness shall reign within me.

You get the idea.  A short story I posted recently is actually an extract from the novel.  You can read The Innkeeper’s story here.  

The working title for the novel is Drinkwater’s Daughter.  Watch this space for further details.  Meanwhile, my sci-fi Western VULTURES’ MOON will appear any day now!

 

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